Films | The Circumnavigators Pt. 1


It was 1927 and Clärenore Stinnes, daughter of politician and WWI-era industrialist, Hugo (and, bless her, a bit of a dead ringer for Prince Charles), jumped in a mass production Adler, grabbed a couple mechanics and cameraman/future lover/husband Carl-Axel Söderström and set off to drive around the world and capture the world's first auto circumnavigation on film.  You can see real footage of the feat here -- or pop to Germany to catch this new flick, "Fräulein Stinnes fährt um die Welt" which started this week.  Very good costumes!

4 comments

  1. larkabout says:

    Thanks for posting this. Can't wait to see it. Great costumes indeed.

  2. ?A thousand thanks for the Clarenore clip. What a gal. I had never heard of her and I'm envious of her adventure. Bet she had a close relationship with her Dad from whence she must have gotten the ambition she had to do what she did. And then married the photographer! If she were alive today I would try and visit her.

    I have actually made that kind of visit once to a woman who pioneered in Central British Columbia. She was in a rest home and I took her on a long drive and we talked all day. What was it like? How did you get through the tough times? Why did you leave the comfort and convenience to live off the land? on and on. These women embody something so vital and so intrinsic to a good life that I feel a sense of loss when they are gone. They stand outside the norms and they must pay some kind of soul price for that. Society does not laud the endeavors of these kinds of women.

    I think life is a banquet table at which most people starve to death.

    Love your blog. Ann

  3. ?A thousand thanks for the Clarenore clip. What a gal. I had never heard of her and I'm envious of her adventure. Bet she had a close relationship with her Dad from whence she must have gotten the ambition she had to do what she did. And then married the photographer! If she were alive today I would try and visit her.

    I have actually made that kind of visit once to a woman who pioneered in Central British Columbia. She was in a rest home and I took her on a long drive and we talked all day. What was it like? How did you get through the tough times? Why did you leave the comfort and convenience to live off the land? on and on. These women embody something so vital and so intrinsic to a good life that I feel a sense of loss when they are gone. They stand outside the norms and they must pay some kind of soul price for that. Society does not laud the endeavors of these kinds of women.

    I think life is a banquet table at which most people starve to death.

    Love your blog. Ann

  4. dfordoom says:

    I'd never heard of Clärenore Stinnes. I must watch this movie when it comes out.