Sunday, November 30, 2008

Raise Your Glasses!

Two major requirements for entry to the Hovey's unconventional Thanksgiving feast: specs and two first names. Ashamed of her 20/20 perfect peepers, Porter put on the prop glasses we picked up for Halloween to join Michael Gregory, Michael Blain and me in our little club.  Chris (Lopez) Thomas (not pictured) rounded out the first-name-first-name-as-surname crew. We drank freely and danced into the night.  The slow cooker did a grand job, too.  I think this means a winter of Sunday roasts!

Thursday, November 27, 2008

An Unconventional Thanksgiving

We helped sacrifice a cow this Thanksgiving, letting that turkey run free (basically, I wanted to use my new slow cooker)...hope our guests don't mind.  Happy Turkey (or non-Turkey) Day to everyone!  May your feasts be grand and delish!

(Photo of our groceries by Porter Hovey)

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Beautiful Bergdorf's!

Once again, the Bergdorf Goodman windows crew has outdone itself -- and all other stores in New York. Barney's went with a sloppy, hippy dippy peace theme and Louis Vuitton has covered itself in that unfortunate multicolored monogram that I thought (hoped) had been relegated to Chinatown around 2002.  The Bergdorf props closet must rival the Museum of Natural History with all the stuffed fauna. All those creatures look so handsome all spiffed up.  Too bad my animals won't be getting the same treatment.  (The white winter wonderland shots come from the women's store...while the handsome manimals clearly show off the boys' side across the street).

















Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Things for Which I Am Thankful: A New Rack at The Bergdorf Sale

I come from a long line of tall ladies.  Well, a couple great grandmothers on my mom's side were short of 5 feet, but my Grandma Vi stretched to about 5'5" and had two daughters who were at least 6 feet (my mom always said she was 5'11 3/4"...odd because she was taller than my 6' dad).  When I was a girl, probably about 7 or 8, mom and auntie took me shoe shopping (they always did this...had to, because I grew out of all my shoes so quickly).  There I relished how my dainty size 6 or 7 foot was nothing like the skis on either of them.  Being so young, I actually brought this up (but also to underscore the lack of struggle I faced in finding shoes, unlike them with their size 11.5s and 12s).  My aunt laughed uproariously, "Just you watch. Your feet will be this size in no time!" I immediately wept and sobbed. Mom and auntie got into a fight. "Why would you tell her something like that?!?!," my mom yelled.  "Because it's her fate!"  Well, it was.  I was 5'9" by 5th grade with feet to match (5'11" by 7th).  So, yesterday, after lunch at 21, I strolled up to Bergdorf's to see the new, incredible holiday windows (more to come on that front) and figured I'd pop in for my usual look-don't-consider trip through the shoe department.  But then I was greeted with two of the world's greatest surprises: A 40% off sale before Christmas...and a big rack of size 12s!  For me it was like walking up to a haystack to find a little bowl of needles all located and set aside.  Chanels! Manolos! Gliding on and fitting like gloves (or shoes that actually fit).  So, I had to splurge.  Got this pair of Guccis, which, for their height, are surprisingly comfy (might have something to do with them actually being my size).

Sunday, November 23, 2008

Soul, Sold to the Devil...

In an effort to create a new generation of opera fans (which is gravely necessary given the current demographic), the Metropolitan Opera has been beaming matinee shows to movie theaters across the country live in HD...and it's really so, so cool.  (I always thought someone should do this for the big sporting events, though they'd have to allow lots and lots of beer).  Port and I caught Damnation of Faust on Saturday.  This version, directed by Robert Lepage, is the most technologically advanced in Met history with video "sets" responding to the music, movement and even body heat.  The big aria, D'amor L'ardente Flamme, is quite a beauty (sung by Susan Graham in the oddest staging ever here), almost as good as my all-time favorite. Next up on the big screen: Thaïs on December 20.

(Image by Sara Krulwich/The New York Times)

Friday, November 21, 2008

HHH Holiday Shopping Guide v6

{1} 3-D Nautilus Puzzle, The Taipir Preservation Fund Gift Shop (a complete treasure trove of animal toys that helps save real endangered species!), $11  {2} Black Ferrari Pedal Racer, American Pedal Car, $410  {3} Italian Spinone, from breeders all around!  {4} Leather Soccer Ball, Manufactum, EUR 129,80  {5} Olde English Henley Cottage Doll House, Doll Houses Superstore, $206.99  {6} The Black Book of Colors by Menena Cottin, Amazon.com, $12.21

Thursday, November 20, 2008

Photo Desire: Desiree Dolron

Cuba. A dark side. A painting of a mustache. A couple of the Dutch photog's pics are up for auction (among some Shores, Newtons, Maplethorpes, Olafs, Goldins etc.) at Phillips de Pury London on Nov. 22 (the rest are just beautiful to see...with the exception of her Exaltation series.  That's gotta raise an eyebrow and give a chill...hopefully).
  

 This one's on the block for an estimated £15,000 to £20,000...



...and this is expected to fetch £10,000 to £15,000.  

All images © Desiree Dolron

Snus To Me


Freshman year at W&L, there seemed to be a constant syncopated wop-wop-wop rhythm of forefingers on plastic at every turn...all those boys packin' their dip.   I always wondered what this did for their love lives (the dipping itself, not the syncopation, though it's a bit like being around someone with tourettes).  While the aesthetics of men using dip are decidedly awful, the aesthetics of tobacco's packages are another story.  Here we have a taste of the Swedish variety, the Snus.  Sweden's the largest Nordic market for snuff, boasting 1 million loyal users (10% of whom are supposedly women).  All sorts of varieties, if you're so inclined, at The Northerner.  




Nordströmmen Julesnus: Danish christmas snus with a strong aroma of Glögg and a deep long taste of cinnamon. Er, yum?



Wednesday, November 19, 2008

HHH Holiday Gift Guide v5

{1} Piana Tote, Floto Imports, $249 {2} Sterling Silver Dumbbell and Cartridge Shell Cocktail Shakers, Asprey (inspired from the archives), so expensive that Asprey doesn't mention the price  {3} Crystal Crest Pin, Kenneth Jay Lane, Intermix, $175  {4} British 24th Foot Officer (Zulu Wars), Sierra Toy Soldier Company, $19.95  {5} Death or Glory Badge (to help rile up more of the Barker Black haters), Military Insignia, £25 for silver, £41 for gold  {6} Matthiessen Cot, Richard Wrightman Design, price upon request {7} Russian Sailor's Striped Telnyashka, The St Petersburger, $23.20 (image from an old J.Peterman catalog)

Monday, November 17, 2008

Antiques Fair Finds

My friend Ryan, collector of industrial lamps and bones, invited me to the Pier Antiques Show on Saturday with the promise of it being a place, "generally a bit overpriced, but where I always find some treasure" (or something nice along those lines).  Well, he came away with an incredible French fishing bag...and I left laden with this gator beauty, the little British guy and the wicker polo helmet (as mentioned earlier today).  Lots of good English stuff to be had: I spied John Derian telling one shop owner: "If Ralph Lauren stops by, tell him to copy these pants for me." The guy said he'd pass it along. 


(The GoldenEye chilled out on the tech annihilation -- selectively.  I'm still in the hallway).

Monday Tunes: Wildwood Flower


Someone must have set off the Goldeneye on Bedford Ave. recently.  In the last couple weeks, our paltry stolen wireless signal has stopped working the moment it crosses through our doorway (forcing me into the very public hallway for hours) and yesterday, our iMac (connected to the scanner and printer) died completely and our iBook stopped accepting image files from Porter's camera.  All very unfortunate timing, given all my wonderful scores from the Antiques Show on Saturday: alligator gladstone bag...wicker polo helmet...and little British lead soldier guy with a Union Jack.  Those will have to remain out of the public eye for another day or two.  Until then, one of the greatest songs ever...  

Friday, November 14, 2008

HHH Holiday Shopping Guide v4

{1} Airedale, from breeders across the country  {2} Diptyque Feu de Bois candle, Aedes de Venustas, $60  {3} Mole Skin Waist Coat, Manufactum, EUR 155  {4} Three-Strap Custom Riding Boots, E. Vogel, $743-$1170  {5} Twig Pencils, Siam International Handicrafts, 18c each (minimum 100)  {6} Bison Leather Gauntlet by Geier Glove, David Morgan, $63  {7} Mink Pillows, Ebay, $129  {8} Navajo Wool/Cotton Woven Rug, American Country Home Store, $188

A Couple More of Tissot's Casual Gents


Gentleman in a Railway Carriage, 1872 (really perfect in so many ways).

Self Portrait, 1898

The Casual Prince

Prince Charles turns 60 today and to commemorate his six decades in tweed, kilts, pinstripes and crowns, he strikes a casual military pose for photographer Hugo Burnand.  It's all inspired by this guy, Frederick Gustavus Burnaby, who was (as The Times of London tells it: an officer in the Household Cavalry who was, "variously, a balloonist, adventurer, Times correspondent, best-selling author and, reputedly, the strongest man the in the British Army. Legend has it that he once carried a pony under one arm").

This portrait of Burnaby, painted by the incredible James Jacques Tissot in 1870, hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Thursday, November 13, 2008

More from the Dark Side

Porter and I had been grappling with wall color choices recently (we had our one black wall, but needed to put our mark on some more poor rental surfaces). A suitable feminine peach? Perhaps a nice moss green? We tried the peach and nothing popped (too similar to the browns), so we scrapped the green concept before we started and went back to our old standby - Behr Beluga.  Now the apartment looks like a hybrid between The Royal Tenenbaums and Charlie Rose...and I love it.  (Will have Port photograph it properly later).

Crossing to the (Barker) Black Side

It may take many a man years to work up to buying himself $925 shoes, but there are less significant obstacles to surmount if one wants to outfit himself in Barker Black: ties, scarves, shoe polish, shoe trees and braces!
 
Shoes range from $495 to $925. The riding boot is $1,400.

Ties: $155

Large silk scarves: $270 (quite nice for ladies, too, I think)

Silk braces: $145

Ties: $155

Bowties: $110

Velvet slippers: $825

Shoe polish: $14 per tin.

Shoe trees: $150

The Nolita store.

The signature sole.

198B Elizabeth Street.
(Between Prince and Spring)
NYC

(Photos by the lovely Porter Hovey)